Lou McGill

Forum Replies Created

  • In reply to: Questions raised by webinar particpants

    12th January 2017 at 5:13 pm #588
    Lou McGill
    Keymaster

    Is there any evidence that graduate employers are more attracted to students who engage with online learning due to global nature of businesses/teams? And would this be a motivation for students to engage?

    Lou McGill
    Keymaster

    Question from a webinar participant around recommendation to reward staff for innovative work in online learning

    I would be really keen to find out about your ideas for different ways of rewarding staff for being innovative

    In reply to: Questions raised by webinar particpants

    12th January 2017 at 5:11 pm #586
    Lou McGill
    Keymaster

    Is there any research on the willingness to adopt and use different formats (visual/ audio / text) of online learning linked to MBTI and learning preferences? Thanks.

    In reply to: What findings are most interesting or surprising?

    12th January 2017 at 5:09 pm #585
    Lou McGill
    Keymaster

    The question was raised by a participant in the session

     

    Being proactive seems to be a key feature – what might course designers do to help online learners assess themselves in this area?

    In reply to: Questions raised by webinar particpants

    12th January 2017 at 5:08 pm #584
    Lou McGill
    Keymaster

    another participant followed this question up with another question:

    how you then do that sensitively, so that those that are relatively experienced, are still able to participate in those vital early stages, without feeling it’s time wasting (for them)

    In reply to: Questions raised by webinar particpants

    12th January 2017 at 5:04 pm #583
    Lou McGill
    Keymaster

    I would be interested to hear more about collaborative learning online – importance, how enabled / facilitated, pitfalls, etc.

    In reply to: Questions raised by webinar particpants

    12th January 2017 at 5:03 pm #582
    Lou McGill
    Keymaster

    To be a successful online learner they need to already be a successful learner especially online, so how can we scaffold beginner online learners?

    Lou McGill
    Keymaster

    Lovely post Robin.

    I think you hit on a significant issue here – with all of the potentials that online learning brings, the formal course development and validation processes may be restricting new approaches to assessment.

    So there is a temptation to take the traditional teaching approaches and make online learning activities mirror these rather than thinking in new ways about learning and assessment. So a good example is the way many online courses still adopt the lecture approach with talking head videos. I’m not saying these are not valid for many subjects. I think it is difficult for teachers who have to work within institutional constraints or within the confines of their subject’s traditional approaches to try new things. Being innovative means taking risks – and this may mean risking learner experiences or achievement.

    But there are some great examples of collaborative and open courses that are accredited formal courses. see the US course http://ds106.us/ and the UK open media courses at Coventry University http://comc.loumcgill.co.uk/

    In reply to: What makes you successful when learning online?

    6th July 2016 at 1:18 pm #377
    Lou McGill
    Keymaster

    I have carried out several in depth interviews with MOOC students (over several different studies including professional and non-professional learners) and it was interesting to ask them what their goals were at the beginning and how these changed.

    Many people I spoke to found it quite difficult to articulate their goals without prompting. The questions helped them to reflect on their main goals and did reveal a wide range of motivations and intentions.

    To some extent the ease of signing up for a “free” online course may mean that some learners join with unclear goals – which may impact on their commitment to finish. I wonder what others think about this. (NB Personally I don’t think it matters if people finish/complete a MOOC if they learn what they wanted to)

    In reply to: Tell us about what helps you as an online learner?

    6th July 2016 at 1:07 pm #376
    Lou McGill
    Keymaster

    To me it sounds like you are not an awful online learner at all – It sounds very much like you know your strengths and limitations and that this helps you to be effective.

    Maybe people who do not have this level of self-knowledge benefit more from structured learning events. So thinking here of younger (no offence;)) people who have not developed an in depth understanding of how they learn best. Not saying that a self-aware learner may not still prefer a structured course though.

    An interesting question is ‘what does it take to become an independent and confident learner’ – is it just something that comes with age and experience, or positive experiences or success (however you define that. And if you are a ‘self aware learner’ does it help when people learn online.

    Not expecting you to answer these questions – just throwing thoughts into the pot.

    In reply to: How do you feel in different online learning situations?

    6th July 2016 at 12:55 pm #375
    Lou McGill
    Keymaster

    Hi David

    I have now added in our sub-questions for this thread. Hopefully they will give some prompts for considering the broader question.

    So we are interested in teasing out differences in say formal or informal learning or for personal enhancement or accreditation.

    Lou

    In reply to: What we plan to do with your contributions

    5th July 2016 at 6:36 pm #369
    Lou McGill
    Keymaster

    Hi Teresa

    we welcome contributions from lifelong learners. Happy for you to offer thoughts about both being a learner or provider:)

    In reply to: What makes you successful when learning online?

    4th July 2016 at 12:05 pm #347
    Lou McGill
    Keymaster

    Yes I totally agree with what you are saying. I think motivation is absolutely linked to how we measure our success as learners. I think that researchers looking at MOOCS are now realising that “dropout” is not always a negative response. I have spoken to lots of MOOc learners in detailed phone interviews and they often reported that they value the courses and learn even if they decide to skip some activities or finish earlier than planned.

    I think your comment highlights how important it is for learners to know what they want to learn and how they learn. So this shows a level of sophistication that not all learners will have – especially when they first start independent learning. I hope we get to hear from students who are experiencing online learning but not necessarily through choice…

    In reply to: Tell us about some positive experiences of online learning?

    4th July 2016 at 11:24 am #345
    Lou McGill
    Keymaster

    Have to agree with you David. The best for me too. My absolute favourite learning experience with #DS106 was the collaborative radio show.

    I don’t actually really enjoy “collaborative learning” so I did cheat a bit and collaborated with my family (partner and home educated son). We made a pirate radio show and In addition to learning loads of technical skills with audio production, and creative storytelling and writing we just laughed so much. So this experience was a brilliant combination of face to face work and online interaction.

    The community of DS106 is really supportive and inspirational. Another favourite aspect of that course was the way they created an assignment bank where students could contribute assignments, build on those already there, and create tutorials. I’m a fan:)

    In reply to: What do you like about being an online learner?

    4th July 2016 at 10:42 am #343
    Lou McGill
    Keymaster

    Why have you chosen to work online (if this has been a choice)?